Category: Europe

Current Emigration to Denmark

Current Emigration to Denmark

Denmark

Area: 42,921 km²
Residents: 5,748,769 (2018)
Population density: 134 E / km²
Form of Government: Parliamentary hereditary monarchy
System of Government: Parliamentary democracy
Neighboring countries: Sweden, Germany
Capital: Copenhagen National
Language: Danish
Religions:
81.5% Protestant,
3% Muslim,
0, 6% Catholics,
0.26% Jehovah’s Witnesses
Currency: Danish krone (DKK)
1 Danish krone = 100 ore
Exchange rates:
1 EUR = 7.44 DKK
1 DKK = 0.13 EUR
1 CHF = 6.85 DKK
1 DKK = 0.15 CHF
(rate from 13.07.2021)
Telephone area code: +45
Time zone: UTC +1

In 2020, 1,479 Germans officially emigrated to Denmark and 785 came back to their homeland. Within the 10 years from 2010 to 2019, 12,708 Germans officially emigrated to Denmark and 8,445 moved back to Germany. This landed this coastal country on the remarkable 6th place on the satisfaction list of all emigration destinations. In 2020 there were officially 26,135 Germans living in Denmark, most of them on the border with Germany.

In 2017, 11.5% of the population was born abroad. Most come from Scandinavian countries, followed by immigrants from Turkey and Eastern Europe. The official language is Danish. German is recognized as the only minority language. Dialects such as Sønderjysk and Bornholmsk are spoken in some parts of the country. English is the most important foreign language in Denmark, but French still has some influence. About 90% of the students learn German as a second foreign language at least temporarily.

Denmark is divided into the following five regions with a total of 98 municipalities: Nordjylland (Northern Jutland and the islands of Vendsyssel-Thy, Mors and Læsø), Midtjylland (central part of Jutland), Syddanmark (south of Jutland and the island of Funen), Hovedstaden (northeast Zealand with the capital Copenhagen and the island Bornholm) and Sjælland (large part of the island Sjælland and the islands Lolland, Falster and Møn).

The economic upswing and reforms on the labor market have led to a sharp decline in unemployment since the mid-1990s. The country is climatically very balanced; not too hot summers, but mild winters due to the influence of the Gulf Stream. Due to the islands and the rugged bays, Denmark has a relatively long coastline of 7,314 km.

Work – job offer

Perhaps things are not going as well as one is used to in the Danish labor market, the job satisfaction rate, but it is among the highest in Europe. Denmark’s labor market combines flexibility with social security for all workers. Everyday work is characterized by flat hierarchies, teamwork and relaxed, friendly cooperation.

All Danish employers are legally obliged to provide you with an employment contract. You are entitled to a contract if you have been employed for at least one month and more than eight hours a week.

Denmark has one of the highest wages in the EU. However, these are reduced to a moderate level by high taxes. In many cases it is easy to get a job because there are no bureaucratic hurdles and you do not need a work permit. It should be noted, however, that not all German training courses are recognized here. Before starting work, you should apply for a tax card (e-tax card) from the responsible tax authority. If you do not do this, the employer pays a tax of 60%.

Everyone who works in Denmark pays income tax. To ensure this, it is necessary to apply for an electronic tax card from the Danish Customs and Tax Administration (SKAT). Without this tax card, the employer will automatically deduct 55 percent tax from your salary. You can find more detailed information on applying for the tax card at https://www.skat.dk/

As an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen, the step into self-employment is made easy. To do this, you need to register your company with the Danish Commerce and Companies Agency. You can do this online at virk.dk (this page only exists in Danish).

There is a particular need for skilled workers in the catering, agriculture and healthcare sectors. Craftsmen, construction workers and engineers are also wanted. The employment office or the central office for job placement and the European Employment Services (Eures) can help with the job search.

If you pay into Denmark’s unemployment fund yourself, you can also take advantage of Denmark’s extensive unemployment insurance, as the following graphic shows (unfortunately only in English at the moment). If you click on the graphic, you will find more information in English on the skift-a-kasse.dk website.

As in Germany, there is a statutory health insurance requirement in Denmark if you have a job. In comparison to Germany, however, Denmark only has state health insurance. To take advantage of this, you should register with the residents’ registration office as soon as possible and apply for a health insurance card. Since the exhibition can take some time, you should cover yourself with a foreign health insurance for the transition period.

Homeschooling, homeschooling, free learning

An increasingly popular alternative to normal school attendance is homeschooling (home tuition or home tuition) or free learning (unschooling). In Denmark, home schooling is legally controlled by the school as an alternative to the compulsory public school system. Inspections are mandatory every year unless specific arrangements have been made.

One possibility to be examined is to have the children taught at home in German by the Wilhelm von Humboldt Online Private School. This means that children can be taught according to the German curriculum by teachers who are accredited in Germany and thus be prepared for the secondary school leaving certificate and the Abitur – information HERE.

Current Emigration to Denmark

Europe Environment

Europe Environment

The continent’s long anthropic history has left an unmistakable mark on the European environmental balance. Although there are several natural parks which, since the beginning of the 21st century, have aimed to preserve increasingly precarious natural habitats, only at the northern extremities (Scandinavian Peninsula) and eastern (the great Russian plain) are there totally uncontaminated environments. Deforestation threatened Europe before any other area in the world due to early industrialization and, to this day, there are areas, such as Ireland, where the original forest has almost disappeared. On the other hand, starting from the end of the twentieth century, the growing political and cultural sensitivity to environmental issues has produced a reversal of the trend; hence greater attention to the protection of what has remained after centuries of intense exploitation and attempts to protect and repopulate some regions of the continent with native species. This increased sensitivity to environmental issues was one of the secondary effects of the EU enlargement process, which also works to “harmonize” the environmental policies of the member countries. Process, to be honest, characterized by continuous setbacks due above all to the difficulty of reconciling particular interests (those detectable on a national scale, relating to the impact of global decisions on within the individual States) with collective interests (the European dimension of the measures) as well as those of the short and long term (investments in technologies that will bring results only in the long distance in the face of costs and commitments to be incurred by implementing policies with a strong impact on the present). An example of this is the Copenhagen Summit (2009), during which the world was able to observe with how little strength and cohesion the Union manages to make its voice heard in international fora and how difficult it is to identify common positions to support. with conviction. Despite this the Union is able to make its voice heard in international fora and how difficult it is to identify common positions to be supported with conviction. See COUNTRYAAH.COM for more information about Western Europe.

Despite this the Union is able to make its voice heard in international fora and how difficult it is to identify common positions to be supported with conviction. Despite this the green economy it presents itself as a real challenge for the development models of the Old Continent, both from a purely economic point of view and, above all, from the environmental side. In December 2008, the EU approved the so-called “20-20-20 Strategy”, which is a package of policies designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and total energy consumption by 20% by 2020, as well as, by the same date, produce at least 20% of the energy from renewable sources. Since the seventies of the twentieth century, particular attention has been paid to the protection of river waters. The illustrative case is that of the Thames, a literally “dead” river already at the end of the nineteenth century which, thanks to the repopulation process it has undergone, has seen the return of previously disappeared species, such as seals and dolphins. The many kilometers of coastline that border the continent and the overlooking marine environments have also deserved renewed attention. There are over 120 protected areas, of which 50 approx. they are completely marine. Among the various initiatives, the establishment of a “sanctuary” in the sea between Italy, France and the Principality of Monaco, made possible thanks to an agreement between the three states, has taken on particular importance. In this wide arm of the sea there are therefore new and severe rules that prohibit the hunting of cetaceans such as the France and the Principality of Monaco, made possible thanks to an agreement between the three states. In this wide arm of the sea there are therefore new and severe rules that prohibit the hunting of cetaceans such as the France and the Principality of Monaco, made possible thanks to an agreement between the three states. In this wide arm of the sea there are therefore new and severe rules that prohibit the hunting of cetaceans such as the common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) or the sperm whale (Physeter catodon). Nonetheless, uncontrolled fishing to which some species are subjected, such as bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), endangered. Precisely on this species, for several years, the governments of the Mediterranean countries, although called to take clear positions, have maintained ambiguous attitudes that attract them harsh criticism from environmentalists. Despite the transformations taking place in the European economy and the ever lower weight assumed by manufacturing processes in the chemical and steel sectors, the continent continues to pay for the high rate of industrialization, no less than the consumerism adopted as a habit by now in almost everyone. the countries that make it up. Hence two of the main unresolved issues on the European agenda in terms of environmental protection: air quality (seriously compromised in some areas such as, for example, the Po Valley in Italy) and waste disposal.

Europe Environment

EU Economy and Currency

EU Economy and Currency

The economy

In January 2002, the single currency, the euro, definitively replaced the franc, the D-mark, the lira and a number of other national currencies. Not all EU countries could or did not want to abandon such a large part of the sovereignty of the nation state. Sweden, Denmark and the United Kingdom chose not to participate. Six more EU countries are outside the euro because they do not yet meet all the economic conditions. The entry requirements are a low central government debt, balanced central government finances, low inflation, a balanced exchange rate and low interest rates.

The countries that do not participate in monetary cooperation do not participate when the euro zone finance ministers meet to discuss economic coordination once a month. They enter the discussions the next day, when the EU as a whole holds a meeting of finance ministers.

However, according to COUNTRYAAH.COM, all EU countries are part of the EU’s economic union. This has a less mandatory character for non-euro countries, but still establishes a relatively strict framework for all. The euro crisis of 2009 led EU countries to tighten the requirements for good housekeeping.

The economic year for an EU country now looks like this:
In late autumn, the European Commission will present an annual growth report with proposals for priorities for the EU countries’ economic policies. It is discussed by all finance ministers who are expected to start from this when they then lay down national budgets.

At the same time, the Commission publishes the macroeconomic imbalances it has found in the countries that risk developing into a “bubble” and making the economy unstable. The European Commission may choose to initiate a closer examination if a risk to stability is perceived as urgent.

In March, the European Commission will deliver country reports with detailed analysis and forecasts of the economy and potential problem areas.
In April, all EU countries must submit an annual economic plan (“convergence program” for non-euro countries such as Sweden, “stability program” for others) and their national budget bill.

In May, the European Commission will issue tailor – made recommendations to each country with proposals for action. These will be discussed and hammered out by the finance ministers in July.
For the euro countries, monitoring is tougher and a country that does not follow the recommended measures is warned and risks fines.

In October, eurozone countries will have to submit their drafts of next year’s national budget bills. Also these nail polish by the European Commission and can end in recommendations for action. The country being criticized must convince a qualified majority of finance ministers to go against the Commission in order to avoid making corrections.

A rule for national budgets is that expenditure must not increase faster than the country’s medium-term growth, if it is not possible to show income that can match expenditure. Countries with budget deficits should aim to strengthen their structural budget balance annually by 0.5% of GDP.

Euro countries must by law introduce automatic correction if their country’s structural deficit exceeds 0.5% of GDP. The idea is that the EU can allow a little more flexibility if a country has a stable structural basis.

Since the introduction of the euro, the country with a large national budget deficit (3% of GDP) has been closely monitored by the European Commission. The country has short deadlines to solve the problem (normally three months). Following the euro crisis, a similar process was introduced to monitor government borrowing. It strikes if borrowing exceeds 60 percent of GDP.

In general, euro area countries must submit to calls for action to correct a risky situation, while non-euro area countries are not obliged to do so.
Figures, assessments and warnings are always published. The markets usually drive up interest rates for a country that is in a bad situation and this extra pressure is considered a welcome extra help to be able to achieve a strict economic discipline in the EU.

Currency

The euro got off to a solid start and, after a few years of a stable exchange rate and low inflation, had established itself as one of the world’s most desirable currencies. But in the wake of the global financial crisis that erupted in full force in 2008, cracks were revealed in the economies of several European countries.

At the beginning of 2008, all euro area countries respected the rule of not having a government budget deficit larger than 3% of GDP. In the summer of 2010, all euro area countries exceeded that limit, as did most other EU countries.

Added to this was the discovery that the euro country Greece had been lying about its economic situation for several years in order to join the eurozone. There was a tumult in the markets and other euro countries were forced to lend money urgently. As a counterclaim, Greece was placed close enough under compulsory administration. The loans that kept the country under wraps were paid out in installments, only after crisis measures had been voted through the Greek parliament.

Ireland then had to ask for support since its government had promised to cover the losses of all Irish banks, which quickly resulted in large gaps in the treasury. After that, it was Portugal’s turn to turn to colleagues for emergency loans.

In the affected countries, people demonstrated against forced cuts and austerity measures. German, Finnish and Dutch voters instead received angry protests against having to help other countries when times were already difficult. It was clear that the relative independence in economic affairs that the euro countries had maintained, despite the single currency, had become unsustainable. When one crashed, the others were dragged along.

EU Economy

Climate in the Azores

Climate in the Azores

When is the best time to travel to the Azores?

The best time to travel to the Azores is from June to October. July and August are the sunniest and warmest months of the year and are therefore particularly suitable for a vacation in the Azores. In addition, the least rain falls in these two months.

The climate of the Azores is subject to minor fluctuations. That is why the Portuguese islands are an attractive travel destination all year round . However, the months of June to October are best for a vacation in the Azores. During this period, temperatures averaging 22 to 26 degrees Celsius prevail during the day. The sun shines at least 5 to 8 hours a day. These months are also the best time to travel to the Azores for beach holidays, as the water temperatures are a pleasant 20 to 23 degrees Celsius.

Below you will find out when is the best time to travel to various activities in the Azores. I’ll tell you which islands belong to the Azores and which climate awaits you. You will also receive other important information about the beautiful islands of the Azores archipelago. So you are well prepared for your Azores vacation!

What is the climate like in the Azores?

According to NEXTICLE, the Azores are influenced by the oceanic-subtropical climate . This means that the summers are pleasantly warm without major heat waves and the winters are not too cold. Precipitation can be expected all year round, but it rains less in summer than in winter. The weather in the Azores is often unpredictable. You have to be prepared for pronounced weather changes within a day and for a cloudy sky. The humidity is high all year round. Therefore, it can sometimes be quite humid in summer. Also pack warm clothes to wear, as it is often very windy in the Azores. As a representative for the climate in the Azores, I am providing you with the climate table for Horta on Faial.

This shows that no major fluctuations are to be expected throughout the year. The warmest months are July, August and September. Here the values ​​are between 25 and 26 degrees Celsius. The coldest month is February with temperatures of 11 to 17 degrees, closely followed by January and March. August brings the most sun with 8 hours of sunshine per day. With 3 days per month, the sun is least visible between November and February. The rainiest months are from October to January. On the other hand, it is the driest with 6 rainy days in June and July. The water temperature is due to the warm Gulf Stream enjoyable. The lowest temperature of the Atlantic reaches from February to April with 17 degrees Celsius. The months June to October are most pleasant for swimming. During this time, the temperatures are between 20 degrees in June and November and 23 degrees Celsius in September.

Climate table for Horta

Jan Feb March Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Max. Temperature in ° C 17 17 17 18 20 22 25 26 25 22 19 18
Min. Temperature in ° C 12 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 19 16 15 13
Hours of sunshine per day 3 3 4 5 6 6 7 8 6 5 3 3
Water temperature in ° C 18 17 17 17 18 20 21 22 23 22 20 19
Rainy days per month 13 13 12 9 9 6 6 7 10 12 14 13
Precipitation in mm 112 99 80 62 56 48 35 53 90 106 115 114

Conclusion

Every single one of the Azores islands is worth a trip. They are not only different in size and number of inhabitants – São Miguel has over 138,000 inhabitants, on Corvo, in contrast, only 460 people – but also offer activities for different tastes . Divers, hikers, beach holidaymakers and nature lovers feel equally at home in the Azores. The islands are well developed for tourism. However, not many holidaymakers have discovered the Azores archipelago as a travel destination for themselves. Therefore, you can enjoy a relaxing time in the Azores without mass tourism.

What is the climate like in the Azores

In the Azores it is pleasantly warm all year round . Be warned, however: the islands’ weather is inconsistent. Sunshine and rain can alternate several times a day. So pack something warm to wear and a rain jacket. The best time to travel to the Azores is from June to October. During this period you can expect the highest temperatures and the least rain. You now have all the important information about the Azores archipelago. Are you as excited as I am? Then book your Azores vacation and pack your bags. You will spend an unforgettable time there, because the Azores Islands, which belong to Portugal, are definitely worth a trip!

Stockholm Travel Guide

Stockholm Travel Guide

Maritime Stockholm is a classic of nearby destinations. Stockholm is a large and international city with excellent shopping and a diverse cultural life. Located on the shores of the Baltic Sea, Stockholm is a city that is familiar to many Finnish tourists. Good connections and a similar culture make traveling easy.

STOCKHOLM

Stockholm is an archipelago city

The Swedish capital, Stockholm, is located on the eastern edge of the country on the shores of the Baltic Sea. Stockholm is literally an archipelago city, as it is built on 14 islands connected by 56 bridges. In front of the city opens the Stockholm archipelago of about 24,000 islands.

According to DigoPaul, Stockholm offers a wide range of contrasts. Tourists can walk through the city’s fine area of ​​Östermalm to Södermalm’s weekend street market, and continue their journey towards the tourist-filled old town.

The histories of Sweden and Finland are closely intertwined, as the current neighboring countries have been one and the same state for centuries. Stockholm’s cultural life has always had a huge impact on Finnish culture, and Finnish tourists have remained loyal to the neighboring capital.

Today, more than 700 years old, Stockholm is the largest city in the Nordic countries and is especially known for its design, shopping and nightlife. Stockholm’s most famous places to visit and attractions include the Old Town, Skansen, the Vasa Museum and Junibacken.

Stockholm holiday

Shopping is one of the most popular activities on a Stockholm holiday.

Stockholm’s climate

The climate in Stockholm is similar to that in the coastal cities of Finland. Winters are relatively mild and summers warm. The coldest time in Stockholm is in January – February, when the average temperature is a couple of degrees. The warmest is in June, July and August, when daytime temperatures rise to over 20 degrees.

Many trips are made to Stockholm from Finland, especially in summer, but the city is still a year-round tourist destination. For example, the atmospheric Christmas market attracts Finnish travelers for Christmas shopping.

Take a city break to Stockholm

Stockholm is primarily a city holiday destination, but the city also offers plenty of activities for tourists who need it. In addition to great shopping, interesting museums and a wide range of restaurants, you can climb the rooftops of Stockholm, paddle in the archipelago in front of the city and explore the city’s parks, not forgetting the great sea jogging or cycling routes.

From a Finnish point of view, Stockholm is by no means particularly affordable, but it is also not an expensive city destination. Popular tourist seasons, such as summer and school holidays, are reflected in the price level of hotels in Stockholm, which is also affected by currency fluctuations between the Swedish krona and the euro.

Travel safely and speak Swedish

Stockholm is a safe travel destination, and Finnish tourists do not experience major cultural differences in the city due to the cultural similarity between the countries. However, you should be careful about Stockholm taxis, as the city’s taxis are known for their stick sticks, which can put tourists at an outrageous price for a taxi ride.

Swedish is, of course, spoken in the Swedish capital, but if the second native language is not so fluent that you dare to use it, English will also work well in the city. If you spend a lot of time outside the city center or in places where there aren’t a lot of tourists, it’s worth a few Swedish phrases to recall before your trip.

FLIGHTS, ACCOMMODATION AND MOVEMENT IN STOCKHOLM

FLIGHTS, ACCOMMODATION AND MOVEMENT IN STOCKHOLM

Stockholm’s Old Town is one of the city’s most popular places to visit.

Flights and trips to Stockholm

Finland has good connections to Stockholm. The most popular and well-established way to move to the neighboring capital is to hop on a ship. In addition to scheduled trips, shipping companies also offer a lot of package tours to Stockholm.

Shipping companies operating in Stockholm include Viking Line and Tallink Silja . Cruise and itinerary prices to Stockholm vary widely, as trips cost around € 30-150, depending on the time and cabin class.

You can also get to Stockholm from Finland by plane. The nearest airport to Stockholm is Bromma Airport, located about ten kilometers from the city. However, most of the flights land at Arlanda, Sweden’s largest and busiest airport, located about 40 kilometers from Stockholm. From the airport, you can reach central Stockholm by bus, Arlanda Express or flat-rate taxi.

Flights to Stockholm are operated by Finnair , SAS and Norwegian . Flights to Stockholm cost around € 30-120. Cheap flights to Stockholm can be conveniently found, for example, with the help of Rantapallo flight search.

Hotels and accommodation in Stockholm

There are hundreds of hotels and other accommodation services in Stockholm. In addition to hotels, you can also live in a hostel, rental apartment or campsite in the Stockholm area. Many of the hotels are located in the city center in the Norrmalm and Södermalm areas.

Stockholm hotels are generally high quality. A hotel night in Stockholm costs on average around 80-100 euros. Many hotels offer discounted rates on weekends, and on weekdays also on weekdays.

If you need slightly cheaper accommodation solutions in Stockholm, hostels, hostels and camping sites are affordable accommodation.

Getting around Stockholm

It is easy to get around Stockholm on foot or by rented bicycle. Many of the city’s attractions are within walking distance.

For slightly longer journeys, you can get around Stockholm by bus, metro and local train. Located right in the city center, Stockholm Central Station is the city’s metro, bus and local train hub.

A one-time ticket for a public transport costs about four euros. In addition to single tickets, the traveler can purchase travel cards that include multiple trips or travel dates. More information on train and bus timetables and ticket prices can be found on Storstockholms Lokaltrafik’s website .

If you plan to travel a lot on Stockholm’s public transport, you may want to get a travel card, which is available for either a day, 72 hours or a week. A valid 24-hour travel card goes unlimitedly to all SL’s means of transport and costs about 12 euros.

In the Stockholm area, taxi prices are at the same level as in Finland.

Sweden Travel Information

Sweden Travel Information

TIPS AND HINTS…

When you think of Sweden, you immediately think of red painted wooden houses, picturesque lakes and large forests. As a holiday destination with a great variety of nature experiences, the most densely populated country in Scandinavia is an exciting travel destination. According to countryaah, Sweden is a country located in northern Europe.

HOW TO TRAVEL TO SWEDEN

… FOR THE TRIP TO SWEDEN

It rarely gets full, because 10 million people live on the 447,000 square kilometers. On the following pages we have put together a range of useful information about your trip to Sweden. Find out in advance to be well prepared.

ENTRY

Since Sweden is a member of the EU, travelers generally do not need any further identification documents. However, it is advisable to carry an identity card or passport with you for customs controls. You can find out more under the heading Getting to Sweden.

LANGUAGE

The national language is Swedish, which is one of the North Germanic languages ​​and is closely related to Danish and Norwegian. In addition, English is spoken at a good level by a large part of the population. Read more about this in the section on the Swedish language.

CURRENCY

In Sweden you pay with Swedish krona, in Swedish krona (plural kronor, abbreviated SEK or kr), which is divided into 100 ore. International credit cards are generally accepted everywhere. In addition, cash machines are available for collection in front of banks. Cashless payment is very common in Sweden, so that even the smallest amounts can be paid by credit card. You can find out how and when it is best to shop in the section Shopping in Sweden.

CLIMATE AND CLOTHING – TEMPERATURE – TRAVEL TIME

Summers in Sweden are short but often warm and sunny; the best travel time is from May to September. In the south of the country, the night lasts a few hours in summer, while beyond the Arctic Circle the sun never sets. Late summer and autumn are considered the wettest seasons.

In the south of the country, the proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf Stream ensure mild temperatures despite the northern location. Malmö has an average of 0 degrees throughout winter. Except in the extreme southwest, snow falls regularly. In the east the winters are colder, so in Stockholm the mean temperature is below freezing from December to February. Lapland and the regions beyond the Arctic Circle have polar climates. The winters are very cold with average temperatures of minus 12 to minus 14 degrees. Lower temperatures are reached again and again. In Haparanda at the northern end of the Gulf of Bothnia, permafrost prevails from November to April. Read more about the climate and the best time to travel to Sweden.

EVENTS

Short for SE by abbreviationfinder, Sweden offers a wide range of events throughout the year. It is best to plan your next visit after the interesting event. We have put together a selection of our event highlights in Sweden for you.

SWEDEN INTRODUCTION

When you think of Sweden, you immediately think of red painted wooden houses, picturesque lakes and large forests. As a holiday destination with a great variety of nature experiences, the most densely populated country in Scandinavia is an exciting travel destination. It never gets full, because 9 million people live on the 447,000 square kilometers.

SWEDEN, THE LAND OF THE ARCHIPELAGO

From the wider archipelago in the south to the Sami areas in Lapland, it is worth getting to know many facets of Sweden. In addition, pulsating metropolises such as Stockholm and Malmö offer the amenities of the big city, such as diverse shopping opportunities in connection with major sights.

Sweden is also ideal for active travelers. Numerous hiking trails and nature parks invite you to go on long tours to be active in the fresh air. In addition, crystal clear rivers and a widely branched water system offer canoeists the best conditions. Those who like things a little quieter look for delicious berries and mushrooms in the woods. And if you fancy a little more company, there are plenty of opportunities in Sweden’s cities to spend the day in museums, galleries and shops.

In the winter months you can also be active in the fresh air. Well-groomed trails invite you to cross-country skiing, in the north of the country there are lifts for downhill skiing. Snowshoe hikes and snowmobile safaris are also enjoying increasing popularity.

Sweden can look back on a varied history and has now become a model for many other countries, especially because of its neutral position in international conflicts and its appreciation of equality. You will get to know the down-to-earth attitude inherent in many Swedes on your trip to Sweden. Find out more about your trip to Sweden in our practical tips for Sweden section.

 

Montenegro Travel Destinations

Montenegro Travel Destinations

Montenegro is still a low-cost destination, suitable for many types of travelers. There is plenty to do for active holidaymakers, beach lions, city tourists and motorists alike. Montenegro’s most popular destinations are the coastal towns of Kotor and Budva, as well as the Durmitor National Park near the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. The capital Podgorica is not yet significantly popular with tourists, but it also offers interesting things to see if you want to get around Montenegro in depth.

Montenegro 6

Situated on the Bay of Kotor, Kotor is a popular city destination.

Short for MNE by abbreviationfinder, Montenegro is a country located in Southern Europe according to countryaah.

Cheap accommodation in Montenegro

For the time being, the price level in Montenegro is clearly lower than in Finland, and it is also reflected in accommodation prices. However, tourism is on the rise and as coastal areas prepare to attract five-star holidaymakers with their new hotels, prices may also hurt closer to other Mediterranean destinations.

In addition to hotels, tourists can stay in Montenegro in inns and hostels, but the popular home culture culture in the Balkans can also be great in Montenegro.

The cheapest way to find a good place to stay is to book a room or even an entire apartment from a local for the duration of your stay. It is possible to book the apartment in advance through accommodation services such as Airbnb, but outside the most popular tourist seasons, the reservation can also be left without worries on site.

Hop on the bus or car

The best way to get around Montenegro is by car or bus. There is also a train network in the country, but the trains are quite slow and the network is not very comprehensive. That is why most tourists prefer to use a bus, for example.

Renting a car is also a viable option if your driving experience is sufficient. The mountain roads are quite narrow as well as winding. Montenegrins put their rally driving skills to the test at least as enthusiastically as Finns on sandy forest roads. However, main roads have been commendably developed in recent years and the use of bypasses and speed limits are monitored. Still, the driving style requires the flexibility typical of the Mediterranean region.

Montenegro 5

MONTENEGRO TRAVEL DESTINATIONS

Montenegro has many atmospheric port cities.

Beautiful Kotor is a tourist favorite

The Bay of Kotor, located in the southwest corner of Montenegro and bordering Croatia, is considered one of the most beautiful natural harbors in Europe. The bay consists of several small bays that connect to each other and to the sea through only one narrow canal. The Bay of Kotor is a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its unique nature and nuanced culture. A decent espresso within the walls of the car-free city of Kotor, known for its architecture, comes to mind as a wonderful experience.

Kotor is a historic attraction on the Montenegrin coast and is one of the best-preserved old towns in the region. Medieval architecture is strong in the cityscape of Kotor, and traditional delicacies from different corners of the country – from cheeses and smoked ham to fruit and seafood – are sold daily in the town square.

Historic Budva represents the coastal idyll

One of the most popular beach resorts in Montenegro is Budva, known for its idyllic small old town. The architecture and food culture of the coastal towns show the influence of the Venetian era, and the vegetation is typical of the Mediterranean – palms, eucalyptus, cypresses and mimosa trees thrive on the coast.

Located in the middle of the coast, the Budva Riviera attracts the majority of tourists heading to Montenegro for a beach holiday every year. Historic villages bring depth to the holiday atmosphere, but the area also offers a vibrant nightlife for those who want it.

Durmitor National Park attracts visitors

Durmitor National Park in northern Montenegro impresses with its stunning mountain scenery and diverse activities. Exploring the national park is best done with your own car, and there are also numerous hiking trails for active travelers of all levels.

Hiking is one of the best ways to explore Montenegro’s stunning mountain scenery, and especially in the northern part of the country, the peaks attract enthusiastic climbers. An additional touch to the hiking trip is staying in a mountain cottage with the locals.

Climbing to over 2,000 meters for the first time is a breathtaking experience, and access to the top catches the breath. Around the sky, right at your fingertips and at the same time so infinitely far away. On flowery slopes, only herds of sheep walk in the rhythm of the clouds.

THE BEST OF MONTENEGRO

Beautiful beaches are only part of the reason for the growing interest of tourists.

Montenegro 4

The best beach resorts

  1. Bar
  2. Ulcinj
  3. Kotor
  4. Budva

The finest experiences

  1. Drive around the Bay of Kotor
  2. Swim in the clear Adriatic Sea
  3. Hike in Durmitor National Park
  4. Visit the old town of Budva
Denmark Destinations

Denmark Destinations

Denmark is a country of happy people. Versatile Denmark is a family-friendly holiday destination. Denmark is constantly rocking the top of happiness statistics when it comes to measuring the living environment and quality of life. Tourists in Denmark also get a little taste of this happiness. Legoland is Denmark’s most popular attraction. According to countryaah, Denmark is a country located in northern Europe.

DENMARK DESTINATIONS

Copenhagen is always worth a visit

Copenhagen is Denmark’s largest population center and a great city holiday destination, combining Scandinavian-style functionality with the atmosphere of Central European metropolises.

The green capital is the main destination for many travelers in Denmark, with plenty to do and see. The Little Mermaid Statue is the most famous of the sights, but you can also get out of the city wildly without a sightseeing tour.

Rent Fillari in Copenhagen and explore the city’s varied residential areas: the vibrant city center, bohemian Nørrebro and trendy Vesterbro. Enjoy Danish cuisine in the Michelin-starred restaurants or street eateries, sit in the atmospheric cafés and watch the stylish Danes tread past.

If you want to have fun, the best amusement park in Northern Europe, Tivoli, is your choice. The amusement park is open at midnight and is also well-suited for adults to spend the night with its bars and restaurants.

Billund, home of Legos

Located in Billund, Legoland is the most popular attraction in the country, with nearly two million visitors a year. In the area you will find a variety of Lego-built worlds, amusement park equipment and everything the little ones in the family could miss.

The city of Billund itself is an agglomeration of just over 6,000 inhabitants that shines with its novelty. In addition to city tours and Legos, there is plenty to do at least for golfers as well as cyclists.

FLIGHTS, ACCOMMODATION AND MOVEMENT IN DENMARK

Young but old Aarhus

Århus is Denmark’s second largest city with more than 300,000 inhabitants. It is a fast-growing and urban population center with a youthful atmosphere.

Youth does not just depend on the atmosphere, as Århus is the youngest city in the country in terms of population. Almost one in five Århus residents is a student and almost 35,000 students attend the city’s university alone.

The young population is counterbalanced by the long history of Århus. The Vikings founded the city more than 1,200 years ago. At the open-air museum in the Old Town, you can experience how working and living used to feel.

In addition to the Old Town, the tourist will find several interesting museums in Århus, the most famous of which is the Aros Art Museum, at the top of which the tourist can view Århus glowing in different rainbow colors through a work of art.

Those who enjoy the outdoors can jump on the back of a horse or ride a canoe, without forgetting, of course, the great opportunities for golfing.

Roskilde is a meeting place of history and popular culture

Roskilde is a city of less than fifty thousand inhabitants only about 30 kilometers from Copenhagen. Like Århus, it is one of the oldest cities in Denmark.

The wings of history roar especially at the foot of the city’s prehistoric monuments. At least Roskilde Cathedral, where most of the Queen and Kings of Denmark are buried, can be considered a must-see.

Today, the city of Roskilde is best known for its legendary summer music festival. The Roskilde Festival attracts more than a hundred thousand music lovers and many world-class stars to the city every year.

Museum of Modern Art Louisiana

Humlebæk, 40 kilometers north of Copenhagen, is home to perhaps Denmark’s most interesting museum. The Museum of Modern Art Louisiana’s art collection is impressive, and works by Andy Warhol and Pablo Picasso , among others, can be admired on site.

In addition to the collection, Louisiana always has changing exhibitions, and the museum also hosts a variety of events throughout the year. Louisiana’s surroundings are beautiful, especially during the summer, and you can have a great lunch out, for example.

Louisiana is easily reached from Copenhagen by train, bus or car.

Impressive nature on the island of Møn

Møns Klint in South Zealand is one of the best kept secrets in the Nordic countries. Known for its flat terrain, Denmark surprises the tourist just an hour’s drive from Copenhagen with its stunning whitewashed cliffs.

On the east coast of the island of Møn, the vertical shimmering white limestone cliffs reach up to 128 meters above sea level, creating an unreal impression, especially in spring and summer, of a sea that rarely glows like turquoise.

Accommodation in Denmark

Short for DMK by abbreviationfinder, Denmark’s diverse accommodations are known for their hospitality and immediate atmosphere, and there are plenty of options for the tourist. As an alternative to regular hotel accommodation, you can experience romance and noble life by staying in one of Denmark’s many castles and mansions.

Also in terms of accommodation, the price level in Denmark is quite high, but a budget traveler can also find a place to stay in one of the numerous hostels. Even hostels are typically clean and comfortable for the price.

According to an old proverb, every Dane wants to own a holiday home in addition to a flagpole. About 40,000 of the cottages are for rent and their demand is strong. The holiday home offers a natural way to explore Denmark and its countryside. Most cottages are located close to water and scenic areas.

THE BEST OF DENMARK

THE BEST OF DENMARK

Copenhagen is one of Denmark’s most interesting travel destinations.

The most interesting cities

  1. Copenhagen
  2. Århus
  3. Odense
  4. Aalborg
  5. Roskilde

The best taste experiences

  1. Smørrebrød
  2. Wiener
  3. Hotdog from the street kiosk
  4. Danish beer
  5. Dishes from Michelin restaurants

The best places to visit

  1. Copenhagen
  2. Legoland
  3. Louisiana
  4. Roskilde Festival
  5. Møn Island